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Kendall Tarte
Professor & Department Chair
Office: Greene Hall 538
Phone: 336-758-5649

Bio

Kendall Tarte, Professor and Chair of the Department of French Studies, received her Ph.D. in French Renaissance literature from the University of Virginia. She has published a book, Writing Places: Sixteenth-Century City Culture and the Des Roches Salon (University of Delaware Press, 2007), and articles in such journals as Romanic Review, Sixteenth Century Journal, Renaissance et Réforme, and French Review. She is co-editor (with Jeff Persels and George Hoffmann) of Itineraries in French Renaissance Literature (Brill, 2017) and (with Anne Hardcastle and Roberta Morosini) of Coming of Age on Film: Stories of Transformation in World Cinema (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009). Her current research, which was supported by a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, studies how geographers, historians, and visual artists depicted France during the Wars of Religion in the sixteenth century. Professor Tarte enjoys teaching courses at all levels, especially her seminars “Perspectives on Paris” (FRH 370) and “Paris: From Department Stores to Mystery Stories” (FYS 100).

CV

Education

Ph.D., French.  University of Virginia.
M.A., French Literature.  University of Virginia.
B.A., English; minor in French.  University of Virginia.

Academic Positions

Professor of French Studies, Wake Forest University, 2019-present. [Associate Professor, 2006-2019; Assistant Professor, 1999-2006; Visiting Assistant Professor, 1997-1999; Instructor, 1996-1997.]

Recent Conference Presentations

Musiques et sociétés dans les provinces de l’Ouest (Aunis, Saintonge, Poitou, Aquitaine) au cours des Guerres de religion (1562-1629), Saintes, France, February 2020. “Quelle musique pour La Puce de Madame des-Roches ?”

Sixteenth Century Studies Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 2018. “Picturing the French Wars of Religion: Landscape and Style.”

Silver Colloquium, Washington University in St. Louis, April 2018. “Creatures of Paper and Confessions of the Flesh: Reading Madeleine and Catherine Des Roches in the 21st Century.

Renaissance Society of America, Boston, Massachusetts, April 2016. “Belleforest’s Language of Place.”

Sixteenth Century Studies Conference, Bruges, Belgium, August 2016. “‘Voyez le malheur de ces guerres’: La Popelinière’s Response to the Civil Wars.”

Kentucky Foreign Language Conference, Lexington, April 2015. “The Textual Progeny of the Des Roches Mother and Daughter.”

Renaissance Society of America, Berlin, Germany, March 2015. “Style and Movement in Accounts of the French Wars of Religion.”

Publications

Books

Writing Places: Sixteenth-Century City Culture and the Des Roches Salon, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2007.

Itineraries in French Renaissance Literature: Essays for Mary B. McKinley. Coeditor and coauthor of Introduction with Jeff Persels and George Hoffmann. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2017.

Coming of Age on Film: Stories of Transformation in World Cinema, Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009.  Coeditor, with Anne Hardcastle and Roberta Morosini.

Recent Articles

“Creatures of Paper and Confessions of the Flesh: Reading Madeleine and Catherine Des Roches in the 21st Century.” L’Esprit Créateur 60.1 (Spring 2020): 23-33.

“Readers Writing in the Gordon Collection Heptaméron.” In Itineraries in French Renaissance Literature: Essays for Mary B. McKinley. Ed. Jeff Persels, Kendall Tarte, and George Hoffmann. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2017. 52-74.

“Madeleine and Catherine Des Roches.” In Oxford Bibliographies in Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Margaret King. New York: Oxford University Press, October 2017. http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780195399301/obo-9780195399301-0369.xml

“Mapping Heresy in François de Belleforest’s Cosmographie Universelle.” In Representing Heresy in Early Modern France. Ed. Gabriella Scarlatta and Lidia Radi. Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2017. 215-31.

Tu or Vous? Forms of Address and Cultural Understanding in Monsieur Lazhar.” The French Review 87.3 (2014): 51-64.

Courses

FRH 111-154: Elementary and Intermediate French
FRH 199: Service Learning in French Language (in conjunction with FRH 320)

FRH 212: Exploring the French and Francophone World
FRH 213 and 214
(Honors): Encounters in French and Francophone Literature and Culture

FRH 216: Studies in French Literature and Culture:
“Growing up”
“Shorts”
“Muslim Youth in France: Contemporary Portraits, Contemporary Issues”
“Encounters”
“The City and its Culture”

FRH 319: Composition and Review of Grammar
FRH 320: French Conversation
FRH 350: Studies in French Language and Culture (in Dijon, France)
FRH 370: Seminar in French and Francophone Studies
“Perspectives on Paris”

“Life of the Book”

FRH 675: Special Topics in French and Francophone Literature: “The Renaissance Body”

FYS 100: First Year Seminar:
“Paris: From Department Stores to Mystery Stories”
“France in the Twenty-First Century”
“The Idea of Celebrity: Past and Present”

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